Oghgul Y-DNA Haplogroup Origins - Last update 9/23/2017
Nomenclatures are from 2008 specifications

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Haplogroup names were recently updated in accordance with the 2008 Y-Chromosome Phylogenetic Tree.
Blue is pre-R to R  - Green IS positive - Brown presumes positive - Normal Black is negative
M42,M168,M89,M9,M45 - These codes follow from DNA Adam to R Haplogroup
 
Tested Positive // Presumed Positivem343
 
M207 DeepSNP-R1b
M173 DeepSNP-R1b
M343+        L278+// P25+ DeepSNP-R1b
L389+
P297+  R1b-M343 Backbone SNP Pack
M269+  DeepSNP-R1b1c U Series /// CTS2664, PF6438, PF6500, L483, L482, L773, L500, L407, F1794, YSC0000194, PF6470, PF6425, YSC0000213, PF6443, CTS623, YSC0000219, CTS8728, CTS10834, PF6265, PF6430, L150, PF6507, PF6477, s10, PF6411, PF6509, PF6495, PF6432, YSC0000203, CTS12478, PF6479, PF6469, L265, PF6409, s3, CTS3575, PF6434, YSC0000225, PF6520, YSC0000294, PF6494
L23+   R1b-M343 Backbone SNP Pack
L51+  R1b-M343 Backbone SNP Pack
L151//P310+ Deep Clade Extended b//L11+ Deep Clade Extended b//YSC0000191//L52//P311 Deep Clade Extended b//YSC0000082
P312+  Deep Clade Extended b
L617+   R1b-M343 Backbone SNP Pack
 
U198- U152- U106- SRY2627- P66- P107- M73- M65- M37- M222- M18- M160- M153- M126- L21- L176.2- L165-
These data are exactly as specified by FTDNA -- I presume that testing negative is as important as testing positive -- since negative values prove Gramps did not grow up in that town (area,region), which could mean he did not even traverse that state (area region), or if he did, he only stopped for provisions. 
I don't like the new designations because I don't understand them, because I have yet to find a cross refference from the old to the new..  Even though the new codes have been used for a while the old designations were dropped and I've been lost ever since.
 


When I run the SNP clustering report most all P312 are found in the US, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Azores, Portugal, Span, Germany, Austria, Italia, Netherlands, Denmark, Italia, England, Scotland, Ireland.  Then sporadic in Scandinavia, and Eastern Europe (looks to be most all west of the Urals), in the Mediterranean islands, and a small Cluster in Israel.  This seems to be pretty much a history of Europe, from perhaps even pre-Celtic era, that is after the warming period of the last ice age.

The Y-DNA Haplogroup Origins chart is supposed to be the basic location where each Haplogroup originated but because of the migration and replacement of both large and small groups over the millennia some of these may be only speculation -- but it does tell us where they are now.  For instance the R-P312 is spread from Norway to the US and Brazil in the Americas.

This then brings up mtDNA as well, the good book "The Seven Daughters of Eve" is a very good read, it explains how from the millions of people that have existed, only these 7 haplotypes (the 7 daughters) remain.  It points out the devastation that occurred when the super caldera called Toba exploded and over a few years killed off most all humans through starvation if not directly.   But from the few birthing women left at the time we now infest the whole earth, so much so that we may run out of fresh water.  Florida sink holes is more numerous than ever.
 

The R Haplogroup Origins table differs from the other tables that looks similar in that this table indicates where people matching my Haplogroup designation is located.   A Haplogroup is determined by the first 12 markers, so we all match the first 12 but possibly no matches after 12.   This could mean these folks don't match me at all except perhaps 50,000 years ago - https://www.familytreedna.com/my/ancient-origins-map/
 


Y-DNA - R Haplogroup Origins
       
R-L617 is a subgroup of R-M269    
       
Parent haplogroup: R-M269    
Age: 25,000      
Region: Western Europe; low frequencies in Turkey, and the Northern Fertile Crescent.
       
12 Marker      
       
Exact Match      
       

Haplogroup

Country

Comments

Match Total

R-BY3970 United States -

1

R-M269 England -

1

R-SRY2627 Ireland -

1

R-U152 United Kingdom -

1

       
GENETIC DISTANCE -1      
       

Haplogroup

Country

Comments

Match Total

R-A7493 Ireland -

1

R-A9002 Ireland -

1

R-BY10 Ireland -

1

R-BY14240 United States -

1

R-BY16148 Poland -

1

R-BY19650 Spain -

1

R-BY20951 Scotland -

1

R-BY25451 United States -

1

R-BY3970 United States -

1

R-BY410 Spain -

1

R-BY9003 Wales -

1

R-DC153 Ireland -

1

R-DC40 Ireland -

1

R-FGC11134 United States -

1

R-FGC11245 United Kingdom -

1

R-FGC14951 England -

4

R-FGC14951 United Kingdom -

1

R-FGC22501 Germany -

2

R-FGC22516 United Kingdom -

1

R-FGC36419 United Kingdom -

1

R-FGC42109 Germany -

1

R-FGC42110 Belgium -

1

R-FGC42110 Germany -

1

R-L159 Ireland -

1

R-L2 England -

1

R-L2 Switzerland -

1

R-L21 England -

1

R-L21 Scotland -

1

R-L21 Spain -

2

R-L21 United States -

2

R-L21 Wales -

2

R-L238 England -

2

R-L238 Scotland -

1

R-L238 United States -

1

R-L371 Ireland -

1

R-L371 Wales -

3

R-L513 United Kingdom -

1

R-L617 England -

1

R-L617 United States -

1

R-M269 England -

3

R-M269 Germany -

3

R-M269 Ireland -

1

R-M269 Portugal Azores

1

R-M269 United Kingdom -

1

R-M343 United States -

1

R-P25 England -

1

R-P25 Scotland -

1

R-P310 United Kingdom -

1

R-P312 England -

1

R-P312 Ireland -

1

R-P312 Norway -

1

R-P312 United Kingdom -

3

R-SRY2627 United Kingdom -

1

R-Y17443 England -

1

R-Y8421 Italy -

1

R-Z1513 Ireland -

1

R-Z156 United Kingdom -

1

R-Z16429 Scotland -

1

R-Z18 Netherlands -

2

R-Z2189 Spain -

1

R-Z2247 United States -

1

R-Z251 Scotland -

2

R-Z253 France -

1

R-Z253 Ireland -

1

R-Z253 Mexico -

1

R-Z253 Scotland -

1

R-Z253 United Kingdom -

1

R-Z253 United States -

1

R-Z2542 England -

1

R-Z295 Sweden -

1

R-Z367 Ireland -

1

R-Z367 United States -

1

R-Z378 Sweden -

1

R-Z49 England -

1

R-Z56 France -

1

R-ZP91 England -

1

       
25 Marker      
       
No Matches Found      
       
37 Marker      
       
GENETIC DISTANCE -4      
       

Haplogroup

Country

Comments

Match Total

R-L617 England -

1

       
67 Marker      
       
GENETIC DISTANCE -4      
       

Haplogroup

Country

Comments

Match Total

R-L617 England -

1

       
111 Marker      
       
No Matches Found      

  Edward Ogle's Haplo Ethnic Makeup

West and Central Europe 59%
Scandinavia 35%
Middle Eastern 5%
Finland and Northern Siberia 2%
British Isles < 2 %
East Europe < 2%
South Central Asia < 1%
South America < 1%
West Middle East < 1%
North America 0%
Asia Minor 0%
North Africa 0%
This data is as reported by FTDNA and posted on Aug 10, 2015.   It shows the Ethnic Makeup of my Haplogroups.   But it does not show dates.   One is then left to speculate that this means that at some time or other, we migrated through the Middle East 50,000 - 20,000 years ago on our way out of East Africa, as we migrated into the Northern European regions indicated.

Elsewhere shows that Celtic tribes controlled most of western and northern Europe before the Roman takeover.   The Celts were also Cro-Magnon.

Concerning the Middle East it may also mean a soldier of the Crusades being of our Haplogroup decided to stay in the Middle East or at least left his DNA behind.  

Since this is about Haplogroups, one must be flexible in its interpretation, considering that soldiers have from the beginning of time left DNA in every land they have marched through.

Hunter-Gatherer 45%

The climate during the Pleistocene Epoch (2.6 mill – 11,700 YA) fluctuated between episodes of glaciation (or ice ages) and episodes of warming, during which glaciers would retreat. It is within this epoch that modern humans migrated into the European continent at around 45,000 years ago. These Anatomically Modern Humans (AMH) were organized into bands whose subsistence strategy relied on gathering local resources as well as hunting large herd animals as they travelled along their migration routes. Thus these ancient peoples are referred to as Hunter-Gatherers. The timing of the AMH migration into Europe happens to correspond with a warming trend on the European continent, a time when glaciers retreated and large herd animals expanded into newly available grasslands.


Evidence of hunter-gatherer habitation has been found throughout the European continent from Spain at the La Brana cave to Loschbour, Luxembourg and Motala, Sweden. The individuals found at the Loschbour and Motala sites have mitochondrial U5 or U2 haplogroups, which is typical of Hunter-Gatherers in Europe and Y-chromosome haplogroup I. These findings suggest that these maternally and paternally inherited haplogroups, respectively, were present in the population before farming populations gained dominance in the area.

Based on the DNA evidence gathered from these three sites, scientists are able to identify surviving genetic similarities between current day Northern European populations and the first AMH Hunter-Gatherers in Europe. The signal of genetic sharing between present-day populations and early Hunter-Gatherers, however, begins to become fainter as one moves further south in Europe. The hunter-gatherer subsistence strategy dominated the landscape of the European continent for thousands of years until populations that relied on farming and animal husbandry migrated into the area during the middle to late Neolithic Era around 8,000–7,000 years ago.
Farmer 43% Roughly 8,000–7,000 years ago, after the last glaciation period (Ice Age), modern human farming populations began migrating into the European continent from the Near East. This migration marked the beginning of the Neolithic Era in Europe. The Neolithic Era, or New Stone Age, is aptly named as it followed the Paleolithic Era, or Old Stone Age. Tool makers during the Neolithic Era had improved on the rudimentary “standard” of tools found during the Paleolithic Era and were now creating specialized stone tools that even show evidence of having been polished and reworked. The Neolithic Era is unique in that it is the first era in which modern humans practiced a more sedentary lifestyle as their subsistence strategies relied more on stationary farming and pastoralism, further allowing for the emergence of artisan practices such as pottery making.

Farming communities are believed to have migrated into the European continent via routes along Anatolia, thereby following the temperate weather patterns of the Mediterranean. These farming groups are known to have populated areas that span from modern day Hungary, Germany, and west into Spain. Remains of the unique pottery styles and burial practices from these farming communities are found within these regions and can be attributed, in part, to artisans from the Funnel Beaker and Linear Pottery cultures. Ötzi (the Tyrolean Iceman), the well-preserved natural mummy that was found in the Alps on the Italian/Austrian border and who lived around 3,300 BCE, is even thought to have belonged to a farming culture similar to these. However, there was not enough evidence found with him to accurately suggest to which culture he may have belonged.

Although farming populations were dispersed across the European continent, they all show clear evidence of close genetic relatedness. Evidence suggests that these farming peoples did not yet carry a tolerance for lactose in high frequencies (as the Yamnaya peoples of the later Bronze Age did); however, they did carry a salivary amylase gene, which may have allowed them to break down starches more efficiently than their hunter-gatherer forebears. Further DNA analysis has found that the Y-chromosome haplogroup G2a and mitochondrial haplogroup N1a were frequently found within the European continent during the early Neolithic Era.

Farmer 43%

Roughly 8,000–7,000 years ago, after the last glaciation period (Ice Age), modern human farming populations began migrating into the European continent from the Near East. This migration marked the beginning of the Neolithic Era in Europe. The Neolithic Era, or New Stone Age, is aptly named as it followed the Paleolithic Era, or Old Stone Age. Tool makers during the Neolithic Era had improved on the rudimentary “standard” of tools found during the Paleolithic Era and were now creating specialized stone tools that even show evidence of having been polished and reworked. The Neolithic Era is unique in that it is the first era in which modern humans practiced a more sedentary lifestyle as their subsistence strategies relied more on stationary farming and pastoralism, further allowing for the emergence of artisan practices such as pottery making.

Farming communities are believed to have migrated into the European continent via routes along Anatolia, thereby following the temperate weather patterns of the Mediterranean. These farming groups are known to have populated areas that span from modern day Hungary, Germany, and west into Spain. Remains of the unique pottery styles and burial practices from these farming communities are found within these regions and can be attributed, in part, to artisans from the Funnel Beaker and Linear Pottery cultures. Ötzi (the Tyrolean Iceman), the well-preserved natural mummy that was found in the Alps on the Italian/Austrian border and who lived around 3,300 BCE, is even thought to have belonged to a farming culture similar to these. However, there was not enough evidence found with him to accurately suggest to which culture he may have belonged.

Although farming populations were dispersed across the European continent, they all show clear evidence of close genetic relatedness. Evidence suggests that these farming peoples did not yet carry a tolerance for lactose in high frequencies (as the Yamnaya peoples of the later Bronze Age did); however, they did carry a salivary amylase gene, which may have allowed them to break down starches more efficiently than their hunter-gatherer forebears. Further DNA analysis has found that the Y-chromosome haplogroup G2a and mitochondrial haplogroup N1a were frequently found within the European continent during the early Neolithic Era.
 
Metal Age Invader 12%

Following the Neolithic Era (New Stone Age), the Bronze Age (3,000–1,000 BCE) is defined by a further iteration in tool making technology. Improving on the stone tools from the Paleolithic and Neolithic Eras, tool makers of the early Bronze Age relied heavily on the use of copper tools, incorporating other metals such as bronze and tin later in the era. The third major wave of migration into the European continent is comprised of peoples from this Bronze Age; specifically, Nomadic herding cultures from the Eurasian steppes found north of the Black Sea. These migrants were closely related to the people of the Black Sea region known as the Yamnaya.


This migration of Bronze Age nomads into the temperate regions further west changed culture and life on the European continent in a multitude of ways. Not only did the people of the Yamnaya culture bring their domesticated horses, wheeled vehicles, and metal tools; they are also credited for delivering changes to the social and genetic makeup of the region. By 2,800 BCE, evidence of new Bronze Age cultures, such as the Bell Beaker and Corded Ware, were emerging throughout much of Western and Central Europe. In the East around the Urals, a group referred to as the Sintashta emerged, expanding east of the Caspian Sea bringing with them chariots and trained horses around 4,000 years ago.

These new cultures formed through admixture between the local European farming cultures and the newly arrived Yamnaya peoples. Research into the influence the Yamnaya culture had on the European continent has also challenged previously held linguistic theories of the origins of Indo-European language. Previous paradigms argued that the Indo-European languages originated from populations from Anatolia; however, present research into the Yamnaya cultures has caused a paradigm shift and linguists now claim the Indo-European languages are rooted with the Yamnaya peoples.

By the Bronze Age, the Y-chromosome haplogroup R1b was quickly gaining dominance in Western Europe (as we see today) with high frequencies of individuals belonging to the M269 subclade. Ancient DNA evidence supports the hypothesis that the R1b was introduced into mainland Europe by the Bronze Age invaders coming from the Black Sea region. Further DNA evidence suggests that a lactose tolerance originated from the Yamnaya or another closely tied steppe group. Current day populations in Northern Europe typically show a higher frequency of relatedness to Yamnaya populations, as well as earlier populations of Western European Hunter-Gatherer societies.

 
Non-European 0%

Most of the world is not of European descent and alternatively, have genetic contributions from influential and significant populations for which we currently do not have enough scientific data. For this reason, those whose ancestral makeup is of non-European descent cannot be grouped into these three particular ancient European categories. As more significant DNA evidence is found in other regions of the world, we will work to continue to connect the ancient with the present in our effort to further our understanding of the interconnectedness between us all. To explore your non-European origins, please see your myOrigins results


 
Links to subsequent Studies and Papers on geographical origins of certain Haplogroups

Y-DNA Haplogroup R-U152 in Britain: (Hypothesis B)