Tracing Human Migration with Y-DNA Page 1 - Last update 1/10/2015

Home    Return    Haplogroup Fitness table 

I have decided not to put my actual data on my web - As soon as I understand this stuff I will write-up a report.

 My Confirmed Haplogroup is R-L617 which matches R1b1a2a1a1b1.  To arrive there I traverse:

M42, M168, M89, M9, M45, M207 and t
hese codes are all presumed positive because they lead to R*

The R-P312 lineage began in West Asia.  It is the descendant of the major R-M343 lineage.  From West Asia, R-P312 spread over great distances. It is now present across Europe and in North Africa.

Test I have taken that lead to the R-L617 Haplogroup:

L11+, L23+, L278+, L389+, L51+, L617+, M173+, M207+, M269+, M269+, M343+, P25+, P297+, P310+, P311+, P312+, PF331+,


These codes were also tested but were all negative:
L21-, L176-, L165-, P107-, U106-, U152-, U198-, P66-, SRY2627-, M222-, M37-, M65-, M73-, M18-, M126-, M153-, M160-
 
R-P312
Defining SNP: P312 (also called S116, rs34276300)
Parent Clade: R-P312


The P312 SNP is downstream of M269 and upstream of the M37, M65, M153, M167, M222 and U152 SNPs, but not U106. It appears to divide R1b1b2 in half. Although unpublished it was included in chip-based commercial DNA tests towards the end of 2007 and analysis of the first available results in early 2008 by amateur geneticists indicated it has a significant place in the Y-DNA tree. This led to rapid development of stand-alone tests by both EthnoAncestry and Family Tree DNA. The results from customers of these companies and testing of control samples for the rarer SNPs have confirmed the status of S116 relative to the above list.

R-M153: This haplogroup has been found mostly in Basques and Gascons, among whom it makes a sizeable fraction of the Y-DNA pool[15][16][17], though is also found occasionally among Iberians in general. The first time it was located (Bosch 2001[18]) it was described as H102 and included 7 Basques and one Andalusian.

R-M167 (also SRY2627): The first author to test for this marker (long before modern haplogroup nomenclature existed) was Hurles in 1999[19]. He found it relatively common among Basques (13/117: 11%) and Catalans (7/32: 22%). Other occurrences were found among other Spanish, Béarnais, other French, British and Germans.

In 2000, Rosser[20] also tested for that same marker, naming the haplogroup Hg22, and again it was found mainly among Basques (19%), in lower frequencies among French (5%), Bavarians (3%), Spanish (2%), Southern Portuguese (2%), and in single occurrences among Romanians, Slovenians, Dutch, Belgians and English.

In 2001, Bosch[21] described this marker as H103, in 5 Basques and 5 Catalans. Further regional studies[22] have located it in significative amounts in Asturias, Cantabria and Galicia, as well as again among Basques. Cases in the Azores and Latin America have also been reported. A total of 85 individuals with this haplogroup have been found so far, almost all of them in academic studies, making it the best documented R1b1b2 subclade[23].

In 2008, two research papers by López-Parra[17] and Adams[16] respectively, identified it as very important in all the Pyrenees, with some presence further south in Iberia (specially in the Eastern half but also in Northern Portugal). It is specially prevalent among Catalans, where it includes some 20% of all men.

The R-U152 (formerly R1b1c10) subclade i (also called S28) and its discovery was announced in 2005 by EthnoAncestry. Although sample sizes are relatively small, it appears to reach a maximum in Alpine Germany and Switzerland. Ethnoancestry's commercial and research branches have shown that U152 is found from Greece westward to the Bay of Biscay in France. It appears to follow the distribution of the La Tene Celtic peoples. The percentages here are much less than found in the Alps. It has yet to be found anywhere in Ireland or Spain. Northern Italy seems to be a meeting place for both U106 and U152. Like U106, U152's specifications were not initially officially published by EthnoAncestry against their previous assertions that data would be publicly published; but again the marker was subsequently identified independently by Sims et al (2007). [13]

A recent Y-SNP to surface is S68 which was reported by EthnoAncestry in 2007. It was originally considered to be what was once referred to as a "private SNP" and by EthnoAncestry as a "Family SNP", but was recently seen in someone from another part of Europe, and with a different surname. It is only with continued research that the time depth of these markers can be estimated. At present S68 has been seen in an individual from Scotland and another from Sweden. EthnoAncestry has determined that this subclade is unlikely to be found in much more than 2% of the R1b population and is thus not considered a polymorphism.

Early results as of November 2008 suggest that R-L21 is common in the British Isles, and is yet to be observed so far in Iberian ancestry. Its subclade R-M222 is particularly associated with the Irish and Scots; in this case, the relatively high frequency of this specific subclade among the population of certain counties in northwestern Ireland may be due to positive social selection, as R1b1b2a1b6b is believed to have been the Y-chromosome haplogroup of the kings of the Uí Néill clan of ancient Ireland.
 
Home   Back  Top

This table leaves me in a quandary - This is my personal data from the National Geographic Genographic Project located at https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/   I transferred my DNA data to the project in 2005 or 2006 can't be sure of the date.  I attempted to resubmit today and was told all my data was already transferred so I know it's there.  but this report differs significantly from FTDNA report of what is supposed to be the same data input.


Branch: P305
Age: More than 100,000 years old
Location of Origin: Africa


The common direct paternal ancestor of all men alive today was born in Africa between 300,000 and 150,000 years ago. Dubbed “Y-chromosome Adam” by the popular press, he was neither the first human male nor the only man alive in his time. He was, though, the only male whose Y-chromosome lineage is still around today. All men, including your direct paternal ancestors, trace their ancestry to one of this man’s descendants. The oldest Y-chromosome lineages in existence, belonging to the A00 branch of the tree, are found only in African populations.

Around 100,000 years ago the mutation named P305 occurred in the Y chromosome of a man in Africa. This is one of the oldest known mutations that is not shared by all men. Therefore, it marks one of the early splits in the human Y-chromosome tree, which itself marks one of the earliest branching points in modern human evolution. The man who first carried this mutation lived in Africa and is the ancestor to more than 99.9% of paternal lineages today. In fact, men who do not carry this mutation are so rare that its importance in human history was discovered only in the past two years.

As P305-bearing populations migrated around the globe, they picked up additional markers on their Y chromosomes. Today, there are no known P305-bearing individuals without these additional markers.


Branch: M42
Age: About 80,000 Years Ago
Location of Origin: East Africa


Around 80,000 years ago, the BT branch of the Y-chromosome tree was born, defined by many genetic markers, including M42. The common ancestor of most men living today, some of this man’s descendants would begin the journey out of Africa to the Middle East and India. Some small groups from this line would eventually reach the Americas, while other groups would settle in Europe, and some would remain near their ancestral homeland in Africa.

Individuals from this line whose ancestors stayed in Africa often practice cultural traditions that resemble those of the distant past. For example, they often live in traditional hunter-gatherer societies. These include the Mbuti and Biaka Pygmies of central Africa, as well as Tanzania’s Hadza. The M42 branch is shared by almost all men alive today, both in Africa and around the world.


Branch: M168
Age: About 70,000 years ago
Location of Origin: East Africa


When humans left Africa, they migrated across the globe in a web of paths that spread out like the branches of a tree, each limb of migration identifiable by a marker in our DNA. For male lineages, the M168 branch was one of the first to leave the African homeland.

The man who gave rise to the first genetic marker in your lineage probably lived in northeast Africa in the region of the Rift Valley, perhaps in present-day Ethiopia, Kenya, or Tanzania. Scientists put the most likely date for when he lived at around 70,000 years ago. His descendants became the only lineage to survive outside of Africa, making him the common ancestor of every non-African man living today.

Your nomadic ancestors would have followed the good weather and the animals they hunted, although the exact route they followed remains to be determined. In addition to a favorable change in climate, around this same time there was a great leap forward in modern humans’ intellectual capacity. Many scientists believe that the emergence of language gave us a huge advantage over other early humanlike species. Improved tools and weapons, the ability to plan ahead and cooperate with one another, and an increased capacity to exploit resources in ways we hadn’t been able to earlier allowed modern humans to rapidly migrate to new territories, exploit new resources, and replace other hominids such as the Neanderthals.
Point of Interest

This male branch is one of the first to leave the African homeland.


Branch: P143
Age: About 60,000 years old
Location of Origin: Southwest Asia


This mutation is one of the oldest thought to have occurred outside of Africa and therefore marks a pivotal moment in the evolution of modern humans. Moving along the coastline, members of this lineage were some of the earliest settlers in Asia, Southeast Asia, and Australia.

But why would man have first ventured out of the familiar African hunting grounds and into unexplored lands? The first migrants likely ventured across the Bab-al Mandeb strait, a narrow body of water at the southern end of the Red Sea, crossing into the Arabian Peninsula and soon after developing mutation P143—perhaps 60,000 years ago. These beachcombers would make their way rapidly to India and Southeast Asia, following the coastline in a gradual march eastward. By 50,000 years ago, they had reached Australia. These were the ancestors of some of today’s Australian Aborigines.

It is also likely that a fluctuation in climate may have contributed to your ancestors’ exodus out of Africa. The African ice age was characterized by drought rather than by cold. Around 50,000 years ago, though, the ice sheets of the Northern Hemisphere began to melt, introducing a short period of warmer temperatures and moister climate in Africa and the Middle East. Parts of the inhospitable Sahara briefly became habitable. As the drought-ridden desert changed to a savanna, the animals hunted by your ancestors expanded their range and began moving through the newly emerging green corridor of grasslands.


Branch: M89
Age: About 55,000 Years Old
Location of Origin: Southwest Asia


The next male ancestor in your ancestral lineage is the man who gave rise to M89, a marker found in 90 to 95 percent of all non-Africans. This man was likely born around 55,000 years ago in Middle East.

While many of the descendants of M89 remained in the Middle East, others continued to follow the great herds of wild game through what is now modern-day Iran, then north to the Caucasus and the steppes of Central Asia. These semiarid, grass-covered plains would eventually form an ancient “superhighway” stretching from France to Korea. A smaller group continued moving north from the Middle East to Anatolia and the Balkans, trading familiar grasslands for forests and high country


Branch: M578
Age: About 50,000 Years Old
Location of Origin: Southwest Asia


After settling in Southwest Asia for several millennia, humans began to expand in various directions, including east and south around the Indian Ocean, but also north toward Anatolia and the Black and Caspian Seas. The first man to acquire mutation M578 was among those that stayed in Southwest Asia before moving on.

Fast-forwarding to about 40,000 years ago, the climate shifted once again and became colder and more arid. Drought hit Africa and the Middle East and the grasslands reverted to desert, and for the next 20,000 years, the Saharan Gateway was effectively closed. With the desert impassable, your ancestors had two options: remain in the Middle East, or move on. Retreat back to the home continent was not an option.


Branch: P128
Age: About 45,000 years ago
Location of Origin: South Asia


The next male ancestor in your ancestral lineage is the man who gave rise to P128, a marker found in more than half of all non-Africans alive today. This man was born around 45,000 years ago in south Central Asia and was likely part of the second wave of migrants to move east from Southwest Asia.

Some of the descendants of P128 migrated to the southeast and northeast, picking up additional markers on their Y chromosomes. This lineage is the parent of several major branches on the Y-chromosome tree: O, the most common lineage in East Asia; R, the major European and Central Asian Y-chromosome lineage; and Q, the major Y-chromosome lineage in the Americas. These descendant branches went on to settle the rest of Asia, the Americas, and Europe. Still many others traveled to Southeast Asia, and some descendants of P128 individuals moved across the waters south and east and are most commonly seen in Oceanian and Australian Aboriginal populations


Branch: M526
Age: About 42,000 Years Old
Location of Origin: South or Southeast Asia


The man who first carried mutation M526 was part of the second wave of settlers that migrated around the Indian Ocean and settled in Southeast Asia. This mutation is shared by men from haplogroups M, N, O, P, Q, R, and S; these are groups common in East Asia, Southeast Asia, Oceania, and the Americas.


Branch: M45
Age: Around 35,000 Years Ago
Location of Origin: Central Asia or South Asia


This paternal ancestor traveled with groups to the open savannas between Central and South Asia during the Paleolithic. These big-game hunters were the parents to two of the most widespread male lineages in modern populations, one that is responsible for the majority of pre-Columbian lineages in the Americas (haplogroup Q)—among others from Asia and Europe—and one that spread farther north and west into Asia and produced the highest frequency lineages in European populations (haplogroup R).

Today, members of this lineage who do not belong to a descendant branch (haplogroups Q or R) are rare, and geneticists have found them most often in India. These populations include such diverse groups as the Saora (23 percent), the Bhumij (13 percent), and Muslims from Manipur (33 percent).
Point of Interest

Known as the Central Asian Clan, this branch gave rise to many distinct lineages that spent the next 30,000 years gradually populating much of the planet.


Branch: M207
Age: About 30,000 Years Ago
Location of Origin: Central Asia


M207 was born in Central Asia around 30,000 years ago. His descendants would go on to settle in Europe, South Asia and the Middle East over the following 20,000 years. Today, most western European men belong to one branch—R-M342—that descended from this lineage. While it appears to have been one of the earliest lineages to settle in Europe more than 25,000 years ago, more recent population expansions associated with the post-glacial repopulation of northern Europe after the end of the last ice age, as well as the spread of agriculture during the Neolithic, also contributed to its high frequency in Ireland, the UK, France and Spain.

One descendant lineage—R-L62—is common in Eastern Europe and India, and was likely spread in part through the migration of Indo-European steppe nomads over the past 5,000 years.


Branch: P231
Age: 25,000 – 30,000 Years Ago
Location of Origin: Central Asia


The Paleolithic ancestor who founded this lineage lived a nomadic lifestyle. His descendants include two major descendant branches that today account for most European men and many others from Central Asia, West Asia, and South Asia.


Branch: M343
Age: 17,000 – 22,000 Years Ago
Location of Origin: South Asia or West Asia


The first members of this lineage lived as hunter-gatherers on the open savannas that stretched from Korea to Central Europe. They took part in the advances in hunting technology that allowed for population growth and expansions.

When the Earth entered a cooling phase, most from this line sheltered in refugia to the southeast of Europe and in West Asia. It was from these refugia that their populations rapidly expanded when the ice once more receded. Some traveled west across Europe. Others moved back toward their distant ancestors’ homelands in Africa, passing through the Levant region. Through these movements and the population boom triggered by the Neolithic Revolution, this lineage and its descendant lineages came to dominate Europe.

Today, it has a wide distribution. In Africa, geneticists have found this lineage in Northern Africa (6 percent) and central Sahel (23 percent). Its frequency in Europe is at times high and at other times moderate. It represents about 7 percent of Russian male lineages, about 13 percent of male lineages in the Balkans, about 21 percent of Eastern European male lineages, 55 to 58 percent of Western European lineages, and about 43 percent of Central European male lineages. In Asia, most men of this lineage are found in West Asia (6 percent) and South Asia (5 percent). However, trace frequencies of around half a percent from this lineage are present in East Asia.
Notable People

Russian Emperor Nicholas II belonged to this lineage

All credit for this table goes to the National Geographic Genome Project.
 

This from the latest Gographic data:  The Genographic Project recently released the most refined evolutionary tree of the human Y chromosome, which every male inherits directly from his father. The new Y tree was created in part through the help of the 300,000 male participants that have joined this one-of-a-kind project to trace their own ancestry and become citizen scientists.

Why should I be excited about the new tree?

Each human male carries a series of DNA mutations in his Y chromosomes that records a portion of the story of humanity. The story begins with a common ancient ancestor that lived in East Africa more than 150,000 years ago.

How different is this Y chromosome tree to the previous versions used by the Genographic Project? The number of branches nearly doubled from 667 to more than 1,200 on our new paternal tree. As a result, new connections and new bifurcations (branch splitting) have since emerged.

The overall structure of the tree remains consistent with past versions, thus not affecting major haplogroup (or lineage) designations. However, more branches mean greater geographic specificity–helping us narrow down where specific lineages are found and when they originated.

What does this mean for Genographic Project Participants’ results? Male results may have changed slightly since we gained greater insights into the paternal migratory paths and discovered new branch tips on the shared Y tree. In particular, we gained a new understanding of internal branching patterns of the tree and of events that occurred between 10,000 and 60,000 years ago as humans moved to populate every corner of the earth.

What does this mean for Genographic Project Participants’ results? Male results may have changed slightly since we gained greater insights into the paternal migratory paths and discovered new branch tips on the shared Y tree. In particular, we gained a new understanding of internal branching patterns of the tree and of events that occurred between 10,000 and 60,000 years ago as humans moved to populate every corner of the earth.

YDNA Adam = L1085 followed by // P305 // P108 // M42 // M168 // P143 // M89 // M578 // M523 // P128 // M526 // L405 // P295 // M45, M207, M343
From YDNA Adam to R1b  The Genographic Y-tree tree does not follow the FTDNA Y-tree, at this time I don't know how they inter-relate
 


 I have included the tables below, from Whit Athey's Haplogroup Fitness table as of 10/25/2015, out of curiosity to see where my markers other strengths are pointing, that is to presume there is a relationship.   Notice that the haplogroup is fixed on the 7th marker.

Now comes the surprise (sort of) in that I have a very high fitness for the haplogroup Q, this is the group in which most, if not all, American Indians are found.   So does this mean that GM Waninto was an Amerindian after all?   I have learned that a mothers mtDNA is passed down to sons for one generation only.  So even if GM Waninto was Amerindian I could not prove it thru DNA. 

There is however a caveat, some of the Q Haplogroup turned back into North and Northwestern Europe, according to FTDNA geographical migrations.
 
 
Haplo-
group 393=13
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 100 0.4
E1b1b 100 3.6
G2a 25 0.3
G2c 100 0.6
H 23 0.1
I1 100 12.0
I2a (xI2a1) 100 1.2
I2a1 100 0.2
I2b (xI2b1) 100 0.6
I2b1 12 0.2
J1 5 0.0
J2a1b 7 0.1
J2a1h 4 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 6 0.0
J2b 15 0.2
L 11 0.0
N 17 0.0
Q 100 0.4
R1a 100 4.7
R1b 100 74.8
T 100 0.6

 

Haplo-
group 390=24
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 1 0.0
E1b1b 100 5.1
G2a 5 0.0
G2c 29 0.1
H 11 0.0
I1 22 0.7
I2a (xI2a1) 100 1.8
I2a1 54 0.1
I2b (xI2b1) 85 0.4
I2b1 17 0.1
J1 9 0.0
J2a1b 9 0.0
J2a1h 9 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 15 0.0
J2b 38 0.3
L 8 0.0
N 30 0.0
Q 93 0.3
R1a 51 1.7
R1b 100 89.1
T 59 0.2
Haplo-
group 19=14
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 2 0.0
E1b1b 54 0.7
G2a 5 0.0
G2c 8 0.0
H 13 0.0
I1 37 0.7
I2a (xI2a1) 31 0.0
I2a1 24 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 27 0.0
I2b1 12 0.0
J1 20 0.0
J2a1b 20 0.0
J2a1h 7 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 28 0.0
J2b 25 0.0
L 19 0.0
N 44 0.0
Q 52 0.0
R1a 24 0.1
R1b 100 98.2
T 69 0.1
Haplo-
group 391=11
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 3 0.0
E1b1b 36 0.1
G2a 6 0.0
G2c 5 0.0
H 14 0.0
I1 27 0.1
I2a (xI2a1) 41 0.0
I2a1 19 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 38 0.0
I2b1 13 0.0
J1 15 0.0
J2a1b 16 0.0
J2a1h 4 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 25 0.0
J2b 20 0.0
L 16 0.0
N 54 0.0
Q 33 0.0
R1a 34 0.0
R1b 100 99.7
T 49 0.0
Haplo-
group 385a=12
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 1 0.0
E1b1b 20 0.0
G2a 8 0.0
G2c 3 0.0
H 5 0.0
I1 22 0.1
I2a (xI2a1) 49 0.2
I2a1 27 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 22 0.0
I2b1 9 0.0
J1 16 0.0
J2a1b 15 0.0
J2a1h 6 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 28 0.0
J2b 18 0.0
L 19 0.0
N 38 0.0
Q 22 0.0
R1a 23 0.0
R1b 61 99.7
T 36 0.0

 

Haplo-
group 385b=12
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 0 0.0
E1b1b 7 0.0
G2a 4 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 1 0.0
I1 10 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 41 0.8
I2a1 33 0.2
I2b (xI2b1) 3 0.0
I2b1 1 0.0
J1 13 0.0
J2a1b 8 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 20 0.0
J2b 8 0.0
L 3 0.0
N 29 0.1
Q 14 0.0
R1a 13 0.0
R1b 37 98.9
T 17 0.0
Haplo-
group 426=12
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 0 0.0
E1b1b 4 0.0
G2a 2 0.0
G2c 0 0.0
H 1 0.0
I1 7 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 6 0.0
I2a1 21 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 2 0.0
I2b1 1 0.0
J1 9 0.0
J2a1b 6 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 9 0.0
J2b 4 0.0
L 3 0.0
N 16 0.0
Q 18 0.0
R1a 18 0.0
R1b 43 100.0
T 12 0.0
Haplo-
group 388=12
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 0 0.0
E1b1b 6 0.0
G2a 4 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 2 0.0
I1 5 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 5 0.0
I2a1 13 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 1 0.0
I2b1 1 0.0
J1 6 0.0
J2a1b 4 0.0
J2a1h 0 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 5 0.0
J2b 1 0.0
L 4 0.0
N 20 0.0
Q 22 0.0
R1a 22 0.0
R1b 48 100.0
T 16 0.0
Haplo-
group 439=11
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 0

0.0

E1b1b

7 0.0
G2a 6 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 2 0.0
I1 7 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 7 0.0
I2a1 17 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 2 0.0
I2b1 2 0.0
J1 8 0.0
J2a1b 6 0.0
J2a1h 0 0.0
J2a1 x
J2a1-bh
6 0.0
J2b 2 0.0
L 6 0.0
N 20 0.0
Q 23 0.0
R1a 23 0.0
R1b 46 100.0
T 19  
Haplo-
group 3891=13
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 1 0.0
E1b1b 10 0.0
G2a 6 0.0
G2c 2 0.0
H 3 0.0
I1 7 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 9 0.0
I2a1 20 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 3 0.0
I2b1 3 0.0
J1 10 0.0
J2a1b 8 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 8 0.0
J2b 2 0.0
L 8 0.0
N 21 0.0
Q 27 0.0
R1a 27 0.0
R1b 50 100.0
T 22 0.0

 

Haplo-
group 392=13
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 1 0.0
E1b1b 6 0.0
G2a 4 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 1 0.0
I1 5 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 7 0.0
I2a1 12 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 1 0.0
I2b1 3 0.0
J1 10 0.0
J2a1b 6 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 6 0.0
J2b 1 0.0
L 9 0.0
N 17 0.0
Q 27 0.0
R1a 20 0.0
R1b 53 100.0
T 25 0.0
Haplo-
group 3892=29
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 1 0.0
E1b1b 7 0.0
G2a 5 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 2 0.0
I1 7 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 9 0.0
I2a1 13 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 1 0.0
I2b1 4 0.0
J1 12 0.0
J2a1b 8 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 7 0.0
J2b 2 0.0
L 11 0.0
N 20 0.0
Q 30 0.0
R1a 21 0.0
R1b 56 100.0
T 28 0.0
Haplo-
group 458=18
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 2 0.0
E1b1b 8 0.0
G2a 6 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 3 0.0
I1 6 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 10 0.0
I2a1 13 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 2 0.0
I2b1 4 0.0
J1 14 0.0
J2a1b 9 0.0
J2a1h 0 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 8 0.0
J2b 2 0.0
L 12 0.0
N 21 0.0
Q 33 0.0
R1a 17 0.0
R1b 54 100.0
T 31 0.0
Haplo-
group 459a=9
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 2 0.0
E1b1b 9 0.0
G2a 7 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 3 0.0
I1 6 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 9 0.0
I2a1 5 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 2 0.0
I2b1 4 0.0
J1 13 0.0
J2a1b 11 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 9 0.0
J2b 2 0.0
L 14 0.0
N 23 0.0
Q 36 0.0
R1a 20 0.0
R1b 56 100.0
T 33 0.0
Haplo-
group 459b=9
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 2 0.0
E1b1b 11 0.0
G2a 9 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 4 0.0
I1 7 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 10 0.0
I2a1 6 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 2 0.0
I2b1 5 0.0
J1 15 0.0
J2a1b 13 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 11 0.0
J2b 3 0.0
L 16 0.0
N 26 0.0
Q 38 0.0
R1a 20 0.0
R1b 52 100.0
T 36 0.0

 

Haplo-
group 455=11
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 3 0.0
E1b1b 12 0.0
G2a 10 0.0
G2c 2 0.0
H 4 0.0
I1 3 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 11 0.0
I2a1 7 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 2 0.0
I2b1 6 0.0
J1 17 0.0
J2a1b 15 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 12 0.0
J2b 4 0.0
L 18 0.0
N 28 0.0
Q 41 0.0
R1a 22 0.0
R1b 55 100.0
T 38 0.0
Haplo-
group 454=12
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 3 0.0
E1b1b 12 0.0
G2a 10 0.0
G2c 2 0.0
H 5 0.0
I1 3 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 11 0.0
I2a1 7 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 2 0.0
I2b1 5 0.0
J1 14 0.0
J2a1b 14 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 12 0.0
J2b 4 0.0
L 20 0.0
N 30 0.0
Q 40 0.0
R1a 18 0.0
R1b 45 100.0
T 39 0.0
Haplo-
group 447=25
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 3 0.0
E1b1b 14 0.0
G2a 9 0.0
G2c 2 0.0
H 5 0.0
I1 3 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 13 0.0
I2a1 8 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 3 0.0
I2b1 6 0.0
J1 15 0.0
J2a1b 15 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 13 0.0
J2b 4 0.0
L 22 0.0
N 32 0.0
Q 42 0.0
R1a 19 0.0
R1b 47 100.0
T 39 0.0
Haplo-
group 437=15
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 4 0.0
E1b1b 12 0.0
G2a 9 0.0
G2c 2 0.0
H 4 0.0
I1 3 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 14 0.0
I2a1 9 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 4 0.0
I2b1 7 0.0
J1 14 0.0
J2a1b 16 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 14 0.0
J2b 4 0.0
L 23 0.0
N 27 0.0
Q 41 0.0
R1a 17 0.0
R1b 49 100.0
T 39 0.0
Haplo-
group 448=18
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 4 0.0
E1b1b 10 0.0
G2a 8 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 5 0.0
I1 3 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 15 0.0
I2a1 5 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 3 0.0
I2b1 6 0.0
J1 12 0.0
J2a1b 15 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 12 0.0
J2b 4 0.0
L 19 0.0
N 25 0.0
Q 38 0.0
R1a 14 0.0
R1b 47 100.0
T 38 0.0

 

Haplo-
group 449=30
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 4 0.0
E1b1b 10 0.0
G2a 8 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 5 0.0
I1 3 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 16 0.0
I2a1 6 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 4 0.0
I2b1 6 0.0
J1 11 0.0
J2a1b 16 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 13 0.0
J2b 4 0.0
L 20 0.0
N 26 0.0
Q 39 0.0
R1a 15 0.0
R1b 48 100.0
T 32 0.0
Haplo-
group 464a=15
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 4 0.0
E1b1b 11 0.0
G2a 7 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 3 0.0
I1 3 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 13 0.0
I2a1 6 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 3 0.0
I2b1 6 0.0
J1 11 0.0
J2a1b 13 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 11 0.0
J2b 4 0.0
L 22 0.0
N 25 0.0
Q 38 0.0
R1a 14 0.0
R1b 50 100.0
T 28 0.0
Haplo-
group 464b=15
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 5 0.0
E1b1b 11 0.0
G2a 6 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 2 0.0
I1 3 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 13 0.0
I2a1 6 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 4 0.0
I2b1 6 0.0
J1 12 0.0
J2a1b 12 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 11 0.0
J2b 5 0.0
L 23 0.0
N 25 0.0
Q 39 0.0
R1a 16 0.0
R1b 52 100.0
T 26 0.0
Haplo-
group 464c=16
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 5 0.0
E1b1b 13 0.0
G2a 4 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 2 0.0
I1 3 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 12 0.0
I2a1 5 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 3 0.0
I2b1 6 0.0
J1 13 0.0
J2a1b 13 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 11 0.0
J2b 5 0.0
L 25 0.0
N 22 0.0
Q 40 0.0
R1a 16 0.0
R1b 53 100.0
T 27 0.0
Haplo-
group 464d=17
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 6 0.0
E1b1b 14 0.0
G2a 4 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 2 0.0
I1 3 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 12 0.0
I2a1 4 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 3 0.0
I2b1 6 0.0
J1 14 0.0
J2a1b 13 0.0
J2a1h 1 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 12 0.0
J2b 6 0.0
L 26 0.0
N 17 0.0
Q 40 0.0
R1a 16 0.0
R1b 54 100.0
T 27 0.0

 

Haplo-
group 460=11
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 6 0.0
E1b1b 14 0.0
G2a 4 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 2 0.0
I1 4 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 12 0.0
I2a1 5 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 3 0.0
I2b1 6 0.0
J1 15 0.0
J2a1b 13 0.0
J2a1h 2 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 12 0.0
J2b 7 0.0
L 27 0.0
N 18 0.0
Q 40 0.0
R1a 17 0.0
R1b 55 100.0
T 27 0.0
Haplo-
group
y-gata-h4=10
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 7 0.0
E1b1b 15 0.0
G2a 4 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 3 0.0
I1 4 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 13 0.0
I2a1 5 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 3 0.0
I2b1 7 0.0
J1 17 0.0
J2a1b 14 0.0
J2a1h 2 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 13 0.0
J2b 7 0.0
L 28 0.0
N 18 0.0
Q 40 0.0
R1a 17 0.0
R1b 54 100.0
T 28 0.0
Haplo-
group ycaiia = 19
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 8 0.0
E1b1b 16 0.0
G2a 5 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 3 0.0
I1 5 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 13 0.0
I2a1 4 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 4 0.0
I2b1 8 0.0
J1 17 0.0
J2a1b 15 0.0
J2a1h 2 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 14 0.0
J2b 8 0.0
L 30 0.0
N 17 0.0
Q 42 0.0
R1a 18 0.0
R1b 55 100.0
T 26 0.0
Haplo-
group
ycaiib = 23
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 8 0.0
E1b1b 15 0.0
G2a 4 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 2 0.0
I1 4 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 12 0.0
I2a1 3 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 3 0.0
I2b1 7 0.0
J1 16 0.0
J2a1b 14 0.0
J2a1h 2 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 14 0.0
J2b 7 0.0
L 28 0.0
N 16 0.0
Q 43 0.0
R1a 19 0.0
R1b 56 100.0
T 27 0.0
Haplo-
group 456=17
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 8 0.0
E1b1b 16 0.0
G2a 4 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 2 0.0
I1 4 0.0
I2a
(xI2a1)
12 0.0
I2a1 3 0.0
I2b
(xI2b1)
2 0.0
I2b1 7 0.0
J1 16 0.0
J2a1b 14 0.0
J2a1h 2 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 14 0.0
J2b 5 0.0
L 27 0.0
N 15 0.0
Q 43 0.0
R1a 19 0.0
R1b 56 100.0
T 27 0.0

 

Haplo-
group 607=15
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 8 0.0
E1b1b 14 0.0
G2a 4 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 2 0.0
I1 4 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 11 0.0
I2a1 2 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 2 0.0
I2b1 8 0.0
J1 15 0.0
J2a1b 13 0.0
J2a1h 2 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 15 0.0
J2b 5 0.0
L 26 0.0
N 16 0.0
Q 44 0.0
R1a 19 0.0
R1b 57 100.0
T 27 0.0
Haplo-
group 576=19
Fitness
score
Proba-
bility
(%)
E1b1a 8 0.0
E1b1b 14 0.0
G2a 5 0.0
G2c 1 0.0
H 2 0.0
I1 4 0.0
I2a (xI2a1) 11 0.0
I2a1 2 0.0
I2b (xI2b1) 2 0.0
I2b1 8 0.0
J1 16 0.0
J2a1b 14 0.0
J2a1h 2 0.0
J2a1 x J2a1-bh 15 0.0
J2b 5 0.0
L 26 0.0
N 16 0.0
Q 45 0.0
R1a 20 0.0
R1b 56 100.0
T 27 0.0
     

Credits:  Notes have been extracted from the very good book "The Journey of Man - a genetic odyssey" by Spencer Wells, Princeton University Press, First Edition.  Also from Family Tree Maker, and National Geographic's Genomproject.  The book does not go into detail of how to interpret or date individual Y-chromosome or mtDNA.   Although mtDNA  leads us farther back in time it does not lend itself to population tracing as does the Y-chromosome.

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Web - The universaty of Arizona has a very nice explanation for for the migration


 
Home   Return  Top