Most Recient Ancestral Origins at FTDNA
 (MRCA) - Last update 10/26/2012

My Ethnic Origins(New) as of - 4/4/17
Modal haplotypes associated with Y-chromosome Haplogroup R
 

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 Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor (TMRCA) for Y chromosome Haplogroups (Karafet et. al (2008))



Description Screenshot from article available online.
Tatiana M. Karafet, Fernando L. Mendez, Monica B. Meilerman, Peter A. Underhill, Stephen L. Zegura, and Michael F. Hammer (2008). New binary polymorphisms reshape and increase resolution of the human Y chromosomal haplogroup tree
User:Guinsberg
The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file  Haplogroup R1b (Y-DNA)





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 The results below show the ancestral origin of those I match or nearly match in the RAO. The ancestral origin information is provided by each testee, and is only as accurate as the testee's knowledge. Testees are instructed to answer "Unknown Origin" when their ancestor's origin is uncertain or not known.

Incorrect origins provided by testees may lead to search results that do not seem logical. for example: Assume your ancestors are from England, but your search results show the ancestral origin of your matches as England, France, AND one match shows an origin of Native American. Does that mean that your ancestors relatives may have lived in England and France? Yes. Does it mean that your ancestor was also a Native American? No. This means that a settler in America had a child with a Native American woman, the child was brought up as a Native American, and that, over time, the family has "forgotten" the European ancestor, and believe their ancestry to be Native American.

Over the span of generations people tend to move, as do borders, so nationality or ethnicticity becomes subjective. for example, testees may enter Germany for ancestral origin, because the land of their ancestors is Germany today, but the land could have been held by Denmark for many centuries.

To see how your ancestral origin is recorded in our database, click on the link above entitled Update Contact Information. You may also update your paternal and maternal ancestral origin on the Update Contact Information page.

Exact matches show people who are the closest to you genetically. The Ancestral origin shows where they have reported to have lived. Since many persons migrated over the past few centuries, you will typically see matches in more than one country.

for information purposes, the Recent Ancestral Origin search also displays results for those who are near matches. A near match is either one step or two steps from your result. An exact match is 12/12 or 25/25. A one step match is 11/12 or 24/25 and the magnitude of the mismatch is 1. A two step match is 10/12 or 23/25 and the magnitude of both mismatches is 1, or it is 11/12 or 24/25 and the magnitude of the mismatch is 2. Near matches show where those who are distantly related to you have migrated over time.
 


For Genealogy usage FTDNA does not evaluate past 4 steps of mutation.  
It is their belief  that on average paper trails don't go back farther, although they have not presicely told me this, they have said it in reoundabout terms.
 
RECENT ANCESTRAL ORIGINS (RAO)
Table 1. Probability for Most Recent Common Ancestor (MRCA) presented by FTDNA
December 2007
Number of
matching markers
50% probability that the MRCA
was no longer than this number of generations
 
90% probability that the MRCA
was no longer than this number of generations
 
95% probability that the MRCA
was no longer than this number of generations
 
10 of 12 16.5  (412.5 yrs=1594) 56  (1400 yrs=607) 72   (1800 yrs=207)
11 of 12 17  (425 yrs=1582) 39  (975 yrs=1032) 47   (1175 yrs=832)
12 of 12 7  (175 yrs=1832) 23  (575 yrs=1432) 29   (725 yrs=1282)
23 of 25 11  (275 yrs=1732) 23  (575 yrs=1432) 27   (675 yrs=1332)
24 of 25 7  (175 yrs=1832) 16  (400 yrs=1607) 20   (500 yrs=1507)
25 of 25 3  (75 yrs=1932) 10  (250 yrs=1757) 13   (325 yrs=1682)
35 of 37 6  (150 yrs=1857) 12  (300 yrs=1707) 14   (350 yrs=1657)
36 of 37 4  (100 yrs=1907) 8  (200 yrs=1807) 10   (250 yrs=1757)
37 of 37 2 to 3  (50-75 yrs=1957-1932) 5  (125 yrs=1882) 7     (175 yrs=1832)
65 of 67 6  (150 yrs=1857) 12  (300 yrs=1707) 14   (350 yrs=1657)
66 of 67 4  (100 yrs=1907) 8  (200 yrs=1807) 9     (225 yrs=1782)
67 of 67 2  (50 yrs=1957) 4  (100 yrs=1907) 6     (150 yrs=1857)

 Modal haplotypes associated with Y-chromosome Haplogroup R.
A few notable STR-based haplotypes have been described for subclades in Haplogroup R.  The most prominent of these is the Atlantic Modal Haplotype that is widespread on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.  This is due to its association with the R1b subclade, which is by far the most abundant Y-chromosome lineage in Western Europe, where it reaches nearly 100% frequency in some populations in the British Isles and the Iberian Peninsula.  Given the hegemony in Western European nations, it is not surprising to find a high level of R1b and AMH also in the Americas.  A few related R haplotypes, e.g. Irish Modal Haplotype and a modal haplotype for the Basque population are also linked to the West European R1b ancestry.  It has been noted that the IMH is largely absent from neighboring England, but could be found at modest frequencies in Scotland and the U.S.    

Confirmation of haplogroup assignment is always made by SNP testing.  Conversely, haplogroup assignment does not indicate that you will have the modal haplotype, recalling the fact that STRs are rapidly changing markers.  Table 2 provides a list of modal haplotypes associated with Haplogroup R.

Table 2.  Modal Haplotypes associated with Y-DNA Haplogroup R

My Values 14 12 24 11 13 13 13 29  
DYS Number 19 388 390 391 392 393 389i 389ii Notes
Atlantic Modal Haplotype 14 12 24 11 13 13 13 29 1
Irish Modal Haplotype 14 12 25 11 14 13 13 29  
Basque Modal Haplotype 14 12 24 11 13 13 NT NT  
Iberia R1b1b2 14 12 24 11 13 13 13 29 4
Anatolia R1b1b2 14 12 24 11 12 13 16 29  
Western European Specific 1 R1b 14 NT 24 10 13 13 12 28  
Scottish Isles R1a1 16 12 25 11 11 13 NT NT  
Iceland R1a 15 12 25 11 11 13 10 27  
Eastern European R1a 16 12 25 10 11 13 13 30  
India (Chenchu) R1a 16 12 24 11 11 13 NT NT  
English R1a 16 12 25 11 11 13 13 31  
Ashkenazim R1a1 16 12 25 10 11 13 NT NT  

Notes: 1 and 4:  Modal types are determined by only 8 markers.  Atlantic and Iberia are a match.
 
I'm not sure what I have here but FTDNA relates all these names to R1b Western European origin. This lineage is also the haplogroup containing
the Atlantic modal haplotype.

Aguirre,  Alberdi,  Archuleta,  Arechavaleta,  Argo,  Aristegui,  Arizmendi,  Arriola,  Arrizabalaga,  Belaunzarán,  Borquez,  Carazo,  Carriaga,   Chavez,   Dos Santos,   
Duran, Horne,  Iguain,  Lachiondo,  Larrabee,  Lizarraga,  Lorda,   Lozano,  Manchego,  Menchaca,  Mendoza,  Monasterio,  Morras,   Moura,  Nava,  Necochea,  
Nieto,  Ochoa, Odiaga, Orbe,  Osa,  Ostiguy,  Rodríguez,  Sanchez,  Segura,  Uribe,  Uribe,  Uribe,  Urresti,  Urriolausokoa,  Verduzco,  Vergara,  Verrette,  Viera,  
Viesca,  Zaballa,   Zeberio and Zuloeta/Zulueta; 

Basque people belong to this Haplogroup and they were among the earliest settlers of the Iberian Peninsula. 73% of modern day Basque share this origin.
The following markers are common to the people bordering Europe's Atlantic within a couple of steps; DYS19 (DYS394)=14, DYS388=12, DYS390=24,
DYS391=11, DYS392=13 and DYS393=13.
 

Western Atlantic Modal Haplotype (WAMH)
DYS 393 390 19 391 385a 385b 426 388 439 389-1 392 389-2
Alleles 13 23 14 11 11 14 12 12 12 13 13 29
Alleles 13 24 14 10 11 14 12 12 12 13 13 29
Alleles 13 24 14 11 11 14 12 12 11 13 13 29
Alleles 13 24 14 11 11 14 12 12 12 13 13 29
Mine 13 24 14 11 12 12 12 12 11 13 13 29

Notes: In human genetics, the Western Atlantic Modal Haplotype (WAMH) is the most frequently occurring 12-marker Y chromosome haplotype associated with haplogroup R1b1a2, the most common haplogroup in Europe. The term was invented by Family Tree DNA to differentiate the newly found 12-marker signature from the six-marker haplotype known as the Atlantic Modal Haplotype.[1] FTDNA customers who have a WAMH match will have a coloured badge (see right) on their personal page. The WAMH badge is triggered when the customer has an exact match with one of four 12-marker R1b1a2 haplotypes:
 


  DYS# Sept 2004
Name 3
9
3

3
9
0

1
9

3
9
1

3
8
5
a
3
8
5
b

4
2
6

3
8
8

4
3
9

3
8
9
-
1

3
9
2

3
8
9
-
2

4
5
8
4
5
9
a
4
5
9
b

4
5
5

4
5
4

4
4
7

4
3
7

4
4
8

4
4
9
4
6
4
a
4
6
4
b
4
6
4
c
4
6
4
d

4
6
0

G
A
T
A

H
4

Y
C
A

I
I
a

Y
C
A

I
I
b

4
5
6

6
0
7

5
7
6

5
7
0

C
D
Y

a

C
D
Y

b

4
4
2

4
3
8

My Values 13 24 14 11 12 12 12 12 11 13 13 29 18 9 9 11 12 25 15 18 30 15 15 16 17 11 10 19 23 17 15 19 17 35 35 12 12
AMH (Wilson)

13

24

14

11

     

12

   

13

                                                   
WAMH (FTDNA)

13

24

14

11

11

14

12

12

12 13

13

29                                                  
Super WAMH (Athey)

13

24

14

11 11

14

12

12

12 13

13

29

17

9

10

 11  11  25  15  19  29  15  15  17  17  11  11  19  23  16  15  18  17  37  38  12  12
Based on these data I have a distance of 16 from the Atlantic modal Haplotype - kinda leaves me out

My Ethnic Origins as of 4/4/2017 from FTDNA
 
European 94%
British Isles < 2%
East Europe < 2%
Finland 0%
Scandinavia 35%
Southeast Europe 0%
Iberia 0%
West and Central Europe 59%
 
East Asian 0%
Northeast Asia 0%
Siberia 0%
Southeast Asia 0%
Middle Eastern 0%
Asia Minor 0%
Central/South Asian 0%
Central Asia 0%
Oceania 0%
South Central Asia < 2%
East Middle East 0%
North Africa 0%
West Middle East < 2%
Jewish Diaspora 0%
Ashkenazi 0%
Sephardic 0%
New World 0%
North and Central America 0%
South America < 2%
African 0%
South Central Africa 0%
East Central Africa 0%
West Africa 0%
It seems this new data renews my previous speculation that Scandinavian blood runs in the family, perhaps all the way back to the 800s,
The "Vikings" era.

I have decided to put my actual data on my web

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