Various Type Test Results
 

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Longevity Results:  I find this data to be useless - so I suggest you not waste your money

In 2005, researchers at Harvard Medical School and UC Davis discovered a few genes that extend lifespan, suggesting that the whole family of SIR2 genes is involved in controlling lifespan.

The results column shows the seven SNPs analyzed in this study. Each SNP has three possible alleles, and the YOUR RESULTS arrow points to your verified results.

REMEMBER: FTDNA does not intend results to diagnose diseases or medical conditions. They do not serve the purpose of medical advice. They are offered exclusively for curiosity purposes, i.e., to see how your results compare with what scientific papers say. Other genetic and environmental variables may also influence these same physiological characteristics. They are merely a conversational piece, or as we like to call them, "cocktail party" tests.
 
rs1042522
CC Longer than average lifespan

GG Average lifespan
CG Average lifespan

rs1800795
CC No increase in longevity
GG Chance for increased longevity
CG Effect on longevity unknown

rs2802292
GG More likely to live to age 100

GT Less likely to live to age 100
TT Less likely to live to age 100

 
rs2811712
AA Average risk for physical impairment

GG Less risk for physical impairment
AG Less risk for physical impairment
 
rs34516635
AA Longer than average lifespan
GG Average lifespan
AG Longer than average lifespan

rs3758391
CC Average mental decline with age
TT Less mental decline with age
CT Less mental decline with age

rs5882
AA Average lifespan
GG Longer than average lifespan
AG Average lifespan

Monoamine Oxidase A (Warrior Gene)

Human behavior is complex and influenced by our genes, our environment, and our circumstances. Popular science and the media have dubbed one of the most provocative and often controversial of genetic variants as the "Warrior Gene." Studies have linked the "Warrior Gene" to increased risk-taking and to retaliatory behavior. Men with the "Warrior Gene" are not necessarily more aggressive, but they are more likely to respond aggressively to perceived conflict.

Located on the X-chromosome, the MAOA gene is one of many genes that play a part in our behavioral responses. The "Warrior Gene" variant reduces function in the MAOA gene. Because men have one copy of the X-chromosome, a variant that reduces the function of this gene has more of an influence on them. Women, having two X-chromosomes, are more likely to have at least one normally functioning gene copy, and scientists have not studied variants in women as extensively.

Your results are below. With one X-chromosome, men with the "Warrior Gene" will show a value of 3. Other men will have normal variants: 3.5, 4, 4.5 or 5. With two X-chromosomes, women will have two results. For example, a woman might have 3 and 3, 3 and 5, or 4.5 and 5.

REMEMBER: We do not intend results to diagnose diseases or medical conditions. They do not serve the purpose of medical advice. They are offered exclusively for curiosity purposes, i.e., to see how your results compare with what scientific papers say. Other genetic and environmental variables may also influence these same physiological characteristics. They are merely a conversational piece, or as we like to call them, "cocktail party" tests.
 
Marker Results Analysis
MAOA 2 Repeats Warrior Variant
  3 Repeats Warrior Variant
  3 and 3.5 Repeats One copy each of the Warrior and Normal Variants
  3.5 Repeats Normal Variant
  4 Repeats Normal Variant Normal Variant
  4 and 5 Repeats Normal Variants
  5 Repeats Normal Variant


The Autosomal Results
page is where you may view your autosomal Short Tandem Repeat (STR) test results.
 
Remember: Results are not intended to diagnose disease or medical conditions, and they do not serve the purpose of medical advice. They are offered exclusively for curiosity purposes, i.e., to see how your results compare with what the scientific papers say. Other genetic and environmental variables may also impact these same physiological characteristics. They are merely a conversational piece, or a "cocktail party" test, as we like to call it.
What is the CCR5 test? Is it a genealogical test?

Among the many advances and discoveries of modern DNA and genetics are 'scientific' oddities. These genetic wonders make it into popular culture and develop a life there that far outpaces their academic worth.  These factoids are best used as 'cocktail conversation' starters. We present them to our current customers (those who have already ordered a standard test) as just that.
 
The Black Death Plague Mutation
CCR5 is a gene on chromosome 3. Our CCR5 test is for a 32 base deletion (delta 32) that has been speculatively linked to survival during the Black Death and the Small Pox Plagues (Galvani 2003) that decimated the population of Europe during the Middle Ages.

The delta 32 mutation is found in between 5% and 14% of Europeans, and is rare in Asians and Africans (Sabeti 2005). Plague theories are belied by its discovery in a Bronze Age gravesite (Hummel 2005).

 
Autosomal CCR 5 for Ed Ogle
The Value shown means I carry no resistance DNA to the plague, this may indicate my direct blood line was lucky not to have contracted the plague at all.   Because our families were in Northumberland during the plague I was very curious to know.  There is an entire Northern village where today everyone in the village carries the resistant DNA.
 
MARKERS VALUE
CCR5 normal- normal
 
 

 

 

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