OGLE  AND  BOTHAL

A HISTORY OF THE BARONIES OF OGLE,
BOTHAL, AND HEPPLE,

THE  FAMILIES  OF  OGLE  AND  BERTRAM,

WHO HELD POSSESSION OF THOSE BARONIES AND OTHER PROPERTIES IN THE COUNTY OF NORTHUMBERLAND AND ELSEWHERE

SHOWING ALSO HOW THE PROPERTY DESCENDED INTO OTHER HANDS;

TO WHICH IS ADDED

ACCOUNTS OF SEVERAL BRANCHES OF FAMILIES

BEARING THE NAME OF OGLE

SETTLED IN OTHER COUNTIES AND COUNTRIES; INCLUDES

APPENDICES AND ILLUSTRATIONS COMPILED FROM ANCIENT RECORDS AND OTHER SOURCES

By   SIR   HENRY   A.   OGLE,   BARONET.


PRINTED PRIVATELY

Newcastle-Upon-Tyne
Andrew and Reid & Company, Limited, Printing Court Buildings

1902
 


PREFACE
Having collected some of the scattered ruins of a castle, reconstruct it so that each stone is in its original position.- These words exemplify to a certain extent the labour and care required in the compilation of a genealogical and historical work of this description, where every detail should be in its right position-and in building under the conditions above, the result, when finished, will be a crude unfinished structure without much beauty, gave here and there an artist would fill up the blanks with foreign stones, cover the whole with ivy or some other creeper, give a foreground and re-beautify the whole, with some loss, however, to the building as a record of antiquity. It is only by repetition and comparing document with document, that anything approaching to accuracy can be obtained:-as a printed book it presents itself in its simplest form for final revision, after which, it ought to be reprinted,-for it is doubtful whether a work intended to contain within itself its own proof, and intended to contain-appar­ently-insignificant details will have sufficient accuracy, or have much literary value, unless the wording is very carefully considered, and whether it has any value whatever remains to be proved, but it will never be worth-saving as a. matter of interest-the time, trouble and money expended upon it, and it is certain that had the compiler known before he started that the labour of five years was involved in the work he would never have embarked upon it.

As it has been impossible to prove everything, it has been necessary to attribute some of the details regarding historical matters to individuals more on inference and probability than on proof. In some measure this refers also to genealogical matters, which in some cases have been accepted from the families concerned, as true, but it is believed that the references or the absence of refer­ence~ will make this obvious. The appendix, built up more or less at random, was first printed and the type broken up, but in building up the text from it the extracts were not found to be sufficiently full, and recourse had to be made to the originals, with this very odd result, that sometimes the text will be found fuller than the appendix on which it has been based. Dates of birth, death, or marriage, where not specially referenced, have been in general taken from the registers of the place where they occurred.
Page 2
The different ways in which names have been spelt may create some confusion, but some of the various ways of spelling are shown in the Index and under the part commencing page 299; it would have been rather lengthy to have shown them all, for instance, Farnham was written Thirnham, Theronham, etc.; Thirston-Thrasterton, etc.; Aydon Shields-Aldensheles, etc.; Longhorsley-Northosle, etc.; and in some cases it is not quite clear whether the township, the manor or lands in the township, were held.

Seeing how tersely every event has been described and the amount of condensed matter inserted, this book, with more exactitude, should rather have been termed "An Index to guide the writer of a History of the Baronies, etc.," than as at present entitled.

In this work the "tangled skein" of the pedigree of the Ogles, spoken of in the 38th volume of the" Publications of the Surtees Society," has been to a certain extent disentangled, and it will be seen in its pages that the old Ogle property was in tail male and that it was alienated in the 16th century by means which in the present day-to say the least-could hardly be called just.

The compiler's thanks are due for kind help to The Duke of Portland and Mr.. Thomas Samples, of Bothal Castle, to the Rev. William Ellis, rector of Bothal, to the Rev. Canon Greenwell, to Mr. J. Crawford Hodgson, to Mr. John G. Hodgson, to Mr. W. H. Knowles, to Mr. Robert Blair, to Dr. Lawrence Adam­son; Mr. Newton Ogle, of Kirkley, kindly had his deeds prepared for extract, Mr. Bertram S. Ogle, of Steeple Aston, originated the idea of the present work, and by his knowledge of history has rendered great assistance. Mr. Robert Bertram E. Ogle, Mrs. Clayton, Mr. St. John Chaloner Ogle, Mr. F. Madan, of the Bodleian Library, and Mr. Randolph and others have also rendered great help, without whom some details might have been overlooked. A great deal has been omitted, and many other plates containing pictures such as those of The Baroness Ogle, Burradon and Hirst towers;, etc., might have been added.

With a possible view of either reprinting the work or of having a supplementary volume containing corrections and additions, the receipt of any notes having this in view would be gladly received by Sir Henry Ogle, the United Service Club, London.
 
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